Bad pasterns

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Jdelgado
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Bad pasterns

Post by Jdelgado » Fri Oct 12, 2018 6:04 am

Hey guys I got a nice little gilt about 3 and a half monthes old and I’ve noticed she’s got bad pasterns. Is there anything I could add to feed to help her get better or help? Do y’all recommend moordflex for joint health?

mjw1980
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Re: Bad pasterns

Post by mjw1980 » Fri Oct 12, 2018 11:15 am

I would say that bad pasterns is going to be a problem and probably wont get better. Put her on a joint supplement so that it may not get worse. That is a structure issue and usually cannot be made better but I could be wrong. I would say that you need to manage her weight very gently.

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kat3311
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Re: Bad pasterns

Post by kat3311 » Thu Oct 18, 2018 3:26 pm

I've had problems with bad pasterns before. I've found that wood and dirt pens serve much better on pasterns than concrete pens. If a concrete pen is your only option, I suggest laying down a thick rubber mat and bedding her deep in shavings.
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HogDoc
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Re: Bad pasterns

Post by HogDoc » Fri Oct 19, 2018 8:57 am

This pastern problem is something we have selected for by not recognizing the difference between big feet with spread toes and down pasterns causing the appearance pf big feet with spread toes.
One other cause of down pasterns is nutritional and the lack of selenium will affect tendon elasticity. The quickest way to fix that is by injection. It's a little confusing because cattle and sheep guys use these injections mostly to loosen tight pasterns. The best way to explain it is adequate selenium normalizes tendon elasticity. Some veterinarians like to use BoSe and others Multimin and some will add products like Phos-Aid. The Multimin Phos-Aid combination has the potential for injection site reactions. Either way it is prescription and in the case of multimin phos aid also extra label so talk with your veterinarian.
The effect of the injections will be minimal in those animals that are selected for this problem.
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