Limping pig

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reddogg
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Limping pig

Post by reddogg » Fri Jul 02, 2004 9:10 pm

One of our fair pigs is limping as though it is stiff .It was a sudden occurence I am hoping it is a sprain but I dont know.It is one rear leg only ,this pig is very heavily muscled and about 210 lbs.Any thoughts?

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Max2mum
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Same problem

Post by Max2mum » Thu Jul 08, 2004 12:05 am

We have the same problem with a 5 month old gilt, she started limping and her hock is sore to the touch, she has very minimal swelling and she stays off of it as much as she can. She is on dirt and her feed is 17% protein. Any ideas about what this is and how to treat it would be very appreciated. Thanks, Carla
Improving Montana club pigs one litter at a time.

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gidkid
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Post by gidkid » Thu Jul 08, 2004 7:25 am

Mycoplasmal Arthritis
The third mycoplasma, Mycoplasma hyosynoviae causes arthritis in
larger pigs weighing 90 to 220 pounds. This disease seems to affect pastured pigs more often than pigs raised on concrete areas. In a typical case, a wave of arthritis goes through the group following a period of stress, such as regrouping of pigs or cold wet weather. Many of the pigs become very lame with swollen hock, elbow, shoulder or stifle joints.
Mycoplasma hyosynoviae often affects new animals, such as boars,
being introduced into an infected herd. New additions to the herd pick up the mycoplasma from apparently healthy carrier animals already in the herd. These animals often carry the organisms in their tonsils for many months with no apparent effects. Swine producers having herds known to be infected often are advised by veterinarians to inject tylosin or lincomycin into new animals being added to the herd to prevent infection and the lameness that follows.
Injectable tylosin or lincomycin given during the first 24 hours of the
acute stage and repeated daily for two to three days usually gives a satisfactory response. In addition, a single injection of a corticosteroid reduces the pain and inflammation but should be given only one time as repeated injections lower resistance to infections. Feed and water forms of tylosin are poorly absorbed and are not effective as a treatment.
The only method of eliminating mycoplasmal infections from a swine
herd is through depopulation and restocking with animals known to be free of these diseases. Because the mycoplasmal diseases are some of the major disease problems in American swine, much additional research is needed in this area. A high priority should be given to developing reliable control programs for swine mycoplasmal diseases.

Dr. Jodi Sterle
Assistant Professor and State Extension Swine Specialist Texas A&M University
Lameness is one of the most common problems in show pigs. There are a variety of causes, including injury, arthritis and structural stress that can cause your animal to look less than its best in the showring. Not all lameness can be prevented, but precautions can be taken to prevent the dreaded problem. The following is by no means an inclusive list, but contains some of the most common causes of swine lameness.
Skeletal Structure. Many lameness problems are caused simply by the way the feet and legs of the animal are aligned and the angularity of the joints. In an earlier article, I stressed the importance of examining the feet and leg soundness of the animals before purchase. Any problems that are apparent in young animals are most likely going to get worse as more weight and stress is placed on the joints and bones as the animal grows. The animal should stand wide at the base and step out with a
long, easy stride. Animals that appear ?tight? in their structure will only get tighter and stiffer as they age. In an attempt to make
pigs ?taller fronted?, many producers have selected for animals that are too straight in their joints. Angulation in the joints (especially the elbow, shoulder, stifle and hock) is necessary for shock absorption during movement. A level design is also a good indication of structural soundness. Animals that ?roach? or arc in their top are usually heavy muscled, but often have severe structural problems that may interfere with their performance in the ring. Muscle can only attach to bone, and extremely heavy muscled pigs often show signs of lameness due to the stress that is put upon the bones by the excess muscle.
Flooring. While cement is by far the best flooring from a disease standpoint, it can be hard on the feet and legs of your pig. Many animals have absolutely no problems when housed on cement, and it is often those pigs that have some structural problems that get irritated and sore. Wood shavings or sand placed on top of the cement may add some cushion if you see a problem developing. Regardless of what flooring you chose, make sure that it is not slippery, especially when wet. Wood that is
wet from water or urine can be extremely slick, causing pigs to slip and possibly injure themselves. It is also a good idea to check out the flooring of the trailer that you are going to be using to transport your pigs and make adjustments if necessary.
Injury. While most injuries heal, there is always the chance of it becoming a chronic problem. Fighting at the feeder,
slipping during transport to the show, extremes in exercise (doing too much too quickly) or other injuries should obviously be kept
at a minimum. Common sense goes a long way in prevention of injuries, but not all of them can be avoided.
Bacterial Infection. The most common infection of joints is mycoplasma, specifically Mycoplasma hyosynoviae. This organism often affects new animals, which may pick up the mycoplasma from carrier animals that appear to be healthy, but are harboring the microorganisms in their tonsils for many months. After a stress, such as transport, a wave of mycoplasma may afflict your pigs. Consultation with a veterinarian is important. Once mycoplasma is diagnosed, injectable tylosin or lincomycin is usually recommended. If given early enough (within 24 hours) and repeated daily for 2-3 days, these treatments are somewhat
effective.
Osteochondrosis. This disease affects the cartilage within the joints and is usually diagnosed with the help of X-rays. Veterinary assistance is usually required.
The keys to preventing lameness are twofold: first, make feet and leg soundness a priority, much like muscling and
leanness, when selecting your pigs. Secondly, observe your pigs closely every day without fail. At the first signs of lameness
(often apparent at feeding time by the constant shifting of the feet (front, back, or both) while standing at the feeder) take the
proper measures IMMEDIATELY. A ?wait and see? attitude will most likely result in a chronic problem, haunting your project all
the way into the showring.
The will to win is important, but the will to prepare is vital.
-Joe Paterno

Show class, have pride, and display character. If you do, winning takes care of itself
-Paul Bryant

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Max2mum
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Post by Max2mum » Thu Jul 08, 2004 5:28 pm

Thanks Gidkid, I came up with the same info in my research last night and got some medicine from the vet today. Its called Doxycycline. I also found out that people can get mycoplasma. According to what the vet said, you can't vaccinate for it either. I just hope this works, the gilt is such a nice gilt and my son plans on breeding her this fall. Thanks again,

Carla
Improving Montana club pigs one litter at a time.

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Post by Sandy » Fri Nov 12, 2004 12:41 pm

HELP! My daughter purchased a very nice, heavily muscled barrow (cut around 100lbs)
out of Am. Standard. He moves his back feet constantly while eating and when standing he will left up one of his back feet occasionaly. He also does something I've never seen. He will eat his feet for 30 seconds and then go get a drink of water, he repeats this till he's done eating.
Anyway I was reading the other posts and it appears he may have [b:f70919c08e]Mycoplasma hyosynoviae [/b:f70919c08e](from Dr. Jodi Sterle's article).
We've had him almost 3weeks now, is it to late to give the shot?
Also, should we give the pig next to him a shot, he doesn't have any symptonms.
Could someone please share their experience with this? Any advice is appreciated. 8)

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spelling error

Post by Sandy » Fri Nov 12, 2004 12:43 pm

Sorry the word FEET should be FEED. Thks.

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Post by 4Hmom » Fri Nov 12, 2004 1:22 pm

We had a hamp barrow that came up lame after our county fair. We were going to take him to state fair but decided to keep him home to rest up for the kansas Jr. Livestock show. We have ours on dirt/mud and we had got a real rainy period and I think in his running and playing he pulled something in his leg and he would not walk on it for nothing. Gave him some stuff for the pain and some glucosamine just in case. He ended up getting better and went on the win 7th place in his class at the Jr. show.

Sometimes it is just as simple as a sprain. It took ours a month to get better completely. Good LUck!

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limping pig - Glucosomine question

Post by Sandy » Sat Nov 13, 2004 2:00 pm

How do you administer Glucosomine? How much do you give? Is it legal? Is it's purpose anti-inflammatory?
What do you give for pain?, withdrawal time? how much?
I'm really consfused on how to treat this pig and if it's Mycoplasma hyosynoviae, or a structure problem.
Tks!

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Post by catalinaa » Mon Jan 11, 2010 12:49 am

Does age matter in a situation of brain injury to the left frontal lobe? I am doing essay questions in my Phychology class and need some info asap! The question on my essay is. Jack was hit by a drunk driver and sustained a severe injury to his left frontal lobe. What should Jack nd his family expect now? What difference, if any, might Jacks age make on the situation?
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Re: Limping pig

Post by Celton » Mon Jan 28, 2019 8:15 am

Help!
I am a livestock shower and my pig (a duroc that weighs 241) limps in his back right leg after a couple
Of minutes. The way he eats is that he eats for a while then he gets drinks. We have a show this weekend and we were thinking of giving him dex. But after reading these articles i think that he might have arthritis but i am not for sure. Please help!

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